“We are Forerunners. Guardians of all that exists. The roots of the Galaxy have grown deep under our careful tending. Where there is life, the wisdom of our countless generations has saturated the soil. Our strength is a luminous sun, towards which all intelligence blossoms… And the impervious shelter, beneath which it has prospered.”

Uncomfortable truths, Pt. 2: The Talmud and the Pentateuch

by | Sep 22, 2018 | Christianity, Uncategorized | 4 comments

In my previous post in this series, which will probably come to 3 posts in total – maybe more if I am not busy or overly lazy, the odds of which are not particularly good, it must be said – I provided some insights (not original on my part, to be clear) about the way that the canonical story of Islam’s origins once again fails to hold up against informed scrutiny.

In this post, we will take a look at some of the ways in which the Jewish religion, as currently practiced, diverges radically from its actual roots in the Pentateuch.

The link above goes to a (very) long article published by a Jew, Ron Unz, at his own magazine for iconoclasts. The article is itself rooted in the works of a highly contrarian Israeli Jew, the late Dr. Israel Shahak, who may well be the most misunderstood and vilified scholar that the Jewish nation has yet produced thus far. Even the Left’s intellectual darling, Dr. Noam Chomsky – a Professor of Linguistics at MIT who insists on inserting himself into political conversations at every possible opportunity – evidently has never produced quite the extreme reactions that Dr. Shahak did back in his time.

Dr. Shahak’s investigations into Talmudic Judaism reveal some huge inconsistencies between what the Pentateuch teaches, and what modern Jews actually practice.

To begin with, as Ron Unz takes great pains to point out, the Torah and the Talmud are two quite different things.

Nobody here needs to be reminded of this, of course, but for the record, the Torah, or the Pentateuch, consists of the first five books of the Old Testament, written down by Moses and presenting the authoritative Word of the Lord. The Torah contains a long list of very precise – one could properly argue that they are a bit over the top, actually – moral, ceremonial, dietary, and administrative laws designed to give Mankind a proper moral framework within which to live a just and holy life.

The Talmud, by contrast, is a massive set of commentaries on the information within the Pentateuch written by rabbis throughout the ages:

Instead, the center of their religious world view is the Talmud, an enormously large, complex, and somewhat contradictory mass of secondary writings and commentary built up over many centuries, which is why their religious doctrine is sometimes called “Talmudic Judaism.” Among large portions of the faithful, the Talmud is supplemented by the Kabala, another large collection of accumulated writings, mostly focused on mysticism and all sorts of magic. Since these commentaries and interpretations represent the core of the religion, much of what everyone takes for granted in the Bible is considered in a very different manner.



The article goes on to point out the following quite explosive revelations about Talmudic Judaism:

  • Such Jews do not worship a monotheistic God, but instead actually worship a number of different entities, both male and female;
  • They also apparently worship Satan – yeah, seriously – just as easily and readily as they do Yahweh;
  • Obedience to ritual is far more important than understanding the point of those rituals;
  • Some of these rituals are designed to trick either God, His angels, or Satan into thinking that the devotees are doing something other than what they actually are – which is a direct contradiction of the very idea, expressed repeatedly in the Old Testament, that God is all-knowing, all-seeing, and always benevolent, if a bit strict;
  • Spells, curses, magicks, and various other forms of jiggery-pokery are actually quite common to Talmudic Judaism;

(Incidentally, I have never quite understood why Jews insist on giving God an actual name. In the New Testament, at least the bits of it that I have read, the name “Yahweh” doesn’t come up at all – of course, I have not yet finished reading the whole thing, so I could easily be wrong here. If one of my readers might be inclined to explain to me just why it is that Jews call their version of the Lord “Yahweh” or “Jehovah”, rather than “the Lord”, “the Father”, or simply “God”, as Christians do, I should be much obliged.)

The list of differences between what Jews supposedly believe, and what they actually do, is truly vast, and the article goes into some detail about those. But even those details barely scratch the surface of the differences between theory and practice.

Indeed, judging by the polytheistic nature of actual Talmudic Judaism, and the fact that it is so obsessed with ritual and superstition, I am forced to conclude that this particular strain of Judaism is really a lot more like Hinduism than it is the religion described within the Old Testament.

Where things get really interesting, though, is in the realm of Judaism’s relations with other faiths, belief systems, and ways of life.

Put simply, Talmudic Judaism could easily compete with Islam for first place in the Bigot Races.


(If that doesn’t get the ADL all riled up, I don’t know what will.)

I must take pains to point out here – for those on the short bus – that this does not mean that Jews in general are bigots and racists. Nor does it mean that Judaism, as understood in the Torah, is necessarily bigoted or evil. And it is absolutely true that Jews have had the proselytising, racially supremacist aspects of their faith beaten and persecuted right out of them for the past 2,000 years – ever since the Romans went and did a right royal number on the House of Israel and scattered the Jews across the face of the Earth.

However, there is absolutely no denying that Judaism was originally a highly supremacist and xenophobic political as well as spiritual force.

As Dr. Shahak points out and Ron Unz amplifies, honest Talmudic Jews make no bones whatsoever about their belief that the rest of us, the non-Jews, the goyim, were put on this Earth to be slaves and servants to Jews, and that we are little better than “beasts in the shape of men”.

I was actually pretty shocked when I followed some of the links contained in the article itself and discovered that apparently Israel is one of the world’s top centres for (illegal) organ harvesting, and even that there may well be some real, documented, historical basis for the ancient “blood libel” against the Jews. The latter charge was leveled at Jews by a number of European Christian kingdoms and rulers, who accused Jews of using the blood of Christian infants, in particular, for ritualistic and healing purposes.

Suffice to say that this is not the Judaism that I have seen and know of firsthand from my Jewish friends, colleagues, and fellow martial artists.

The Jewish attitude toward Christianity is, of course, fairly well known and understood – but not well appreciated – by most Christians. None of my readers need me to remind them that Jews regard Jesus Christ as the arch-heretic, a Jew from the bloodline of King David himself who repudiated Jewish canonical law (from their perspective) and broke most of the religious and ceremonial commandments from the Pentateuch. The Jews regard Christianity as a dreadful and terrible heresy, a perversion of the Law as passed down to them by the Lord.

If they had their way, Christianity would be eradicated from the face of the Earth. Indeed, a good many Jews pray for precisely that outcome on a daily basis.

I am not being hyperbolic; if anything, as the contents of Dr. Shahak’s book point out, my points are understatements.

Yet Christians are highly tolerant of Jews, generally speaking, especially in the modern day and especially in America. While I am certainly not enough of a knucklehead to suggest that anti-Semitism has never existed, it should not be controversial to state that America has been the friendliest home that Jews have ever known outside of Israel itself. While European nations have often persecuted and demonised Jews, for a variety of reasons, the Catholic Church in particular has claimed that the Jews are God’s chosen people and are a protected group, ever since at least the time of Pope Gregory the Great, who issued a Papal Bull in reaction to the persecution of Jews in Palermo that stated very clearly that Christians have a religious and moral duty to protect Jews.

One other reality that must be pointed out, which Ron Unz does, and which Jews absolutely hate to be reminded of, is the fact that Jews maintain utterly disproportionate control and influence over the media, the centres of political power, the levers of the financial markets, and the halls of acadaemia. Wherever there is power and influence to be had, especially of a monetary or political nature, you will find Jews.

I say that as someone with, as I have said many times before, a very real personal soft spot for Jews. I consider myself their friend and ally, and I am a staunch supporter of Israel’s right to exist. Even so, the fact remains that modern Jews often do not understand what it is that they worship, where their religion comes from, where it has departed from the teachings of Moses, and how far down various and quite dangerous blind alleys they have been led.

Jews got into those positions of power and influence not because they were particularly or necessarily smarter than everyone else – the longstanding myth of superior Ashkenazi Jewish intelligence has been thoroughly and conclusively debunked by our own beloved and dreaded Supreme Dark Lord (PBUH).

Rather, Jews often have those positions of power and authority because, well, tribes gonna tribe. Anyone who believes that Jews get into positions of power, authority, privilege, and wealth solely on the basis of merit and superior intelligence, is someone to whom I would very much like to sell a call option on the Brooklyn Bridge.

Ultimately, the question of what and how Jews worship is, of course, up to them. The problem is that so many of the Jews remain so ignorant of their own faith – and of how far the Talmudic orthodoxy has strayed from the actual, literally written-in-stone Word of God.

The Jews claim – rightly, I think – that the Lord chose them to be His people, to carry His Law into the world. Both as individuals and as a collective group, the Jews have many highly admirable, very likable traits – if you spend much time around real Israeli Jews in particular, you will discover very quickly that they have a marked lack of tolerance for stupidity, time-wasting, and excessive politeness. They get straight to the point.

These sterling qualities, however, cannot make up for the fact that so many of them remain so shockingly ignorant of the core tenets of their own faith, as taught to them by their own scholarly community.

That ignorance is what men like Mr. Unz and Dr. Shahak seek to address. Until and unless Talmudic Jews come to terms with their own lack of knowledge about their faith, and the extremely dire logical and spiritual consequences of their beliefs, they will never make any real progress toward redemption or salvation.

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4 Comments

  1. Dire Badger

    Jesus was the first convert to Christianity. It's that simple.

    Reply
  2. Unknown

    Dear Didact
    I'm following your blog for the past year, and have read all (and I mean all) of your posts. I agree with you on 90% of what you wright, I want to correct you on some of what is written in this post.
    My background: I'm an Israeli Jew, who practices very little of my Mitzvot, yet have a good understanding on my religion and familiar (to some extent) with the Talmud.
    I have divided the reply to several parts as I can't post more than 4096 characters per reply.
    Part 1
    To begin with, as Ron Unz takes great pains to point out, the Torah and the Talmud are two quite different things.
    I know this may come as a shock, to those who are less familiar with Judaism, but it is no news. The Talmud is completely different from the Torah. And I mean completely!
    The Torah is a book that has been written more than 2500 years ago, and relates to a country and people having an Immanent God with them. This is not the case after the fall of the second Temple (God has "moved" up to the heavens and no longer resides in the world). You may have a different opinion of God, but that's how most Jews believe.

    Among large portions of the faithful, the Talmud is supplemented by the Kabala, another large collection of accumulated writings, mostly focused on mysticism and all sorts of magic
    That's a miss conception. The Kabala explains the world in mystical terms and provide "esoteric" know-how. The Talmud is a "set of rules" based on case studies and interpretations. They, most of the time, complement and not supersede.

    Such Jews do not worship a monotheistic God, but instead actually worship a number of different entities, both male and female
    That is a long time argument. The main core believe of Judaism, which is based in one of our oldest "battle cry"/"identification" is " Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is One " (Deuteronomy 6:4). It is confusing that Judaism acknowledges divine entities, both male and females, as well as good and evil. You sometime "acknowledge the devil" (Literally). This is usually to avoid consequences in a specific context or in order to help a poor soul. There is n worship in the Kabala, but there are instances in which one may use devils (highly not recomeded).

    Obedience to ritual is far more important than understanding the point of those rituals
    Correct. The origin is Mount Sinai sighting of God. "All the words which the Lord hath spoken will we do" (Exodus 24:3). The Hebrew phrase for this is "Na'aseh VeNishma" which means "We shall do (first) and then listen (understand)". In Judaism you sometimes do not know WHY, but you still need to practice.

    Reply
  3. Unknown

    Part 2
    Some of these rituals are designed to trick either God, His angels, or Satan into thinking that the devotees are doing something other than what they actually are
    That is again, a miss conception. Tricking the devil – Yes. No one tries to trick God. Satan – Yes.

    Spells, curses, magicks, and various other forms of jiggery-pokery are actually quite common to Talmudic Judaism

    Correct. The Talmud was signed (=finalized editing) about 1500 years ago. At that time those were part of Judaism. Not proud of it, but it is part of my religion. Guess what? It is also part of Christianity till not that recent. Don't see the problem.

    Incidentally, I have never quite understood why Jews insist on giving God an actual name. In the New Testament, at least the bits of it that I have read, the name "Yahweh" doesn't come up at all

    Misconception. God's name is unknown and is comprised of 42 or 72 letters. "Yehowah" means is Hebrew "Who he is". "God said to Moses, “I AM WHO I AM,”" (Exodus 3:14). "Yehowah" is a derivative of Being.

    If one of my readers might be inclined to explain to me just why it is that Jews call their version of the Lord "Yahweh" or "Jehovah", rather than "the Lord", "the Father", or simply "God", as Christians do, I should be much obliged.)
    Again, misconception. We call our God many "names" – The Lord, God (in Hebrew it is plural word – ELOHIM or Elokim) , He who is Blessed (HAKABA). No one in their right mind today uses "Yehowah", unless he or she wants to shock the audience.

    Indeed, judging by the polytheistic nature of actual Talmudic Judaism, and the fact that it is so obsessed with ritual and superstition, I am forced to conclude that this particular strain of Judaism is really a lot more like Hinduism than it is the religion described within the Old Testament.
    I understand why you think so, but it is wrong. It completely unlike Hinduism (know a little bit about it). Judaism is not polytheistic in any way.

    Reply
  4. Unknown

    Part 3
    Put simply, Talmudic Judaism could easily compete with Islam for first place in the Bigot Races.
    I know you'll be surprised, but I agree. This is a classic "Gamma" attribute of Jews. Behind it are 1800 years of persecution and mind blowing attempts to preserve an old race/religion against tremendous forces. Not an excuse, but an explanation. This part of my religion needs serious reform.

    As Dr. Shahak points out and Ron Unz amplifies, honest Talmudic Jews make no bones whatsoever about their belief that the rest of us, the non-Jews, the goyim, were put on this Earth to be slaves and servants to Jews, and that we are little better than "beasts in the shape of men"
    Agree. See previous point.

    Yet Christians are highly tolerant of Jews, generally speaking, especially in the modern day and especially in America
    True. Reminding you that the Talmud was signed some 1500 years ago. Christians at that time were anything but tolerant, until about 200 years ago.

    the Catholic Church in particular has claimed that the Jews are God's chosen people and are a protected group, ever since at least the time of Pope Gregory the Great, who issued a Papal Bull in reaction to the persecution of Jews in Palermo that stated very clearly that Christians have a religious and moral duty to protect Jews
    That's new for me. However somehow Jews were persecuted repeatedly and nothing of the sort helped them most of the time.

    Ultimately, the question of what and how Jews worship is, of course, up to them. The problem is that so many of the Jews remain so ignorant of their own faith – and of how far the Talmudic orthodoxy has strayed from the actual, literally written-in-stone Word of God
    You'll be surprised again, but I somewhat agree. Most Jews are secular and don't bother to study their religion and understand it.

    Just to sum it up:
    I believe some of what is written is incorrect. I may be off, as my understanding may be lacking. Judaism is not polytheistic, but houses divine entities, both good and bad as well as good and evil.
    As per redemption and salvation – I believe (and it is my belief) that a great reform of Judaism will come, but probably only in the next generation.

    Reply

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