“We are Forerunners. Guardians of all that exists. The roots of the Galaxy have grown deep under our careful tending. Where there is life, the wisdom of our countless generations has saturated the soil. Our strength is a luminous sun, towards which all intelligence blossoms… And the impervious shelter, beneath which it has prospered.”

Atheism is a moral vacuum

by | Jan 27, 2021 | Christianity | 5 comments

I’ve been stupidly busy today with a group project, so I’ll be very honest and admit right up front that this is my equivalent of “phoning it in”. That being said – before we get to the real point of this post, let’s go over a few important life lessons:

  1. “Groupwork” is merely a euphemism for “complete f***ing waste of five hours of your life”;
  2. In real life, outside of the military and highly hazardous occupations where you depend on the men – yes, MEN – by your side for your very survival, TEAMWORK doesn’t accomplish one single damned thing;
  3. Related: the secret to getting anything done in any halfway functioning organisation is not “let’s all get consensus and buy-in with this list of endlessly stupid minutiae and bulshit”;
    • Corollary: The REAL secret to getting shit done can be found in ancient military wisdom: “find the one or two guys in this shop who are not complete incompetents, and work them to death”;
  4. If you can at all in any way avoid it, DO NOT work with women – it will be the end of any form of productivity or progress in your project;
    • This is because women require far more “touchy-feely time” and get much more emotional over trivial shit than men do;
    • Women also cannot deal with blunt rejections of their ideas very well and require you to waste tremendous amounts of time mollycoddling them;
  5. Power corrupts, and PowerPoint corrupts absolutely;
  6. The best PowerPoint presentation in the world is the one that never has to be done;
  7. Learn the fine art of delegating;

Right, on to the main point of today’s post.

As the title says, atheism does not present any real hope or solutions in the long run. This is not news to any of you, I’m sure. Several of you are former atheists and the rest are most likely deists or secularists who aren’t quite militant about it. But the reason why atheism does not offer any solutions to moral problems is because it cannot.

Until fairly recently, though, Christians tended to be fairly limited in their ability to articulate this particular point. That is not the case any longer. A number of highly talented and skilled Christian apologists have distilled the ancient wisdom of great thinkers like St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Augustine of Hippo down into easily digestible yet logically sound arguments.

For a highly readable yet rigourous overview of these arguments, you probably cannot do better than I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist\ by Drs. Norman Geisler and Frank Turek. This is the logically and ontologically sound expansion to the excellent, highly readable, but theologically perhaps questionable Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis – indeed, the former book takes a number of direct inspirations and references from the latter.

But sometimes we need to hear these things for ourselves, and that is where Prof. John Lennox comes in:

Atheists are certainly capable of living exemplary moral lives. Many atheists are far more moral than so-called “Christians” – the secular kind, anyway. But those same atheists cannot explain or justify their morality. It’s simply not possible. Without God, there is no such thing as objective morality.

The realisation of this problem played a big part in my movement away from materialism and atheism. The sheer mathematical impossibility of the materialistic worldview cemented it. But I never could have gotten to the point where I bent the knee and accepted Christ if I had not first seen and understood, very clearly, that the only realistic way forward to a morally just and decent world lay in accepting an objective and unbending standard of morality.

That is what Dr. Lennox makes clear. Sooner or later, we are all going to grapple with that Problem of Evil. And one way or another, we’re going to find that there is only one real answer to it.

We won’t necessarily like that answer – it’s not an easy one to live with. But the answer simply is what it is. It’s up to us to accept it.

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5 Comments

  1. Jonathan Puckett

    You’ve remarked multiple times about the “questionable theology” in Mere Christianity. Can you expand on that point with examples? It’s the book I recommend to anyone serious about Christianity and also the one I reread the most but I don’t recall any grave/major misses. However, I freely admit to not being an expert on theology.

    p.s. Dr. Turek is awesome, in addition to his book, his CrossPoint app is a great tool with the apologetic arguments built in and on-hand. His youtube is great too.

    Reply
    • Didact

      You’ve remarked multiple times about the “questionable theology” in Mere Christianity. Can you expand on that point with examples?

      Yes. Here are two. They account for much of the criticism levelled at Mere Christianity – by other Christians.

      That is not to say that it is a bad book. It is in fact an extremely dense, yet very readable, work of faith and apologetics. At its best, it is truly superb, which is why highly rigourous thinkers like Dr. Norman Geisler and Dr. Frank Turek use and reference it in their work. I certainly recommend it to any “baby Christian” or sympathetic non-believer.

      p.s. Dr. Turek is awesome, in addition to his book, his CrossPoint app is a great tool with the apologetic arguments built in and on-hand. His youtube is great too.

      Indeed. I’ve taken to featuring him in the Great Mondaydact Browser Crushers for that exact reason.

      Reply
      • Jonathan Puckett

        Thank you for the response, I better understand your comments now.

        Reply
  2. Kapios

    Not related to morals, but lately I have been thinking about religion a lot, and when I saw this post I thought this must be a sign. Lately, I’ve been going through hard time (unrelated to corona) and I just don’t feel like I have the strength to hold on. At some point I was a strong believer and I even carried a picture of virgin Mary in my pocket everywhere I went as stress relief and just to help me cope better in situations. Even if this was placebo, it worked. I just felt better.

    At some point I started looking into religious debates, read many articles, a few books and became a hardcore atheist for a few years. I don’t think in that extreme now and I’m thinking of coming back to religion with more informed opinion. There are a ton of things to learn, but I don’t want to fall into the paralysis by analysis trap. Indecision is punishable by God, Universe or whatever you want to call it.

    Even in the years where I was in disbelief, I still raised my hands into the sky, or clasped my hands together and whispered ‘please let it work’ every time I was under severe stress.

    If it’s not too much trouble for you, can you share a post with your opinions on prayer and dealing with the stresses of life, especially events that you can’t control?

    Reply
  3. Didact

    At some point I was a strong believer and I even carried a picture of virgin Mary in my pocket everywhere I went as stress relief and just to help me cope better in situations. Even if this was placebo, it worked. I just felt better.

    Yes. This is something that materialists simply cannot understand. The connection with the numinous is one of the most powerful stress relievers that we have.

    There are a ton of things to learn, but I don’t want to fall into the paralysis by analysis trap. Indecision is punishable by God, Universe or whatever you want to call it.

    You sound like you’re in the same position that I was about 5 years ago. The key thing here is to take your time and REALLY understand what you’re getting into. You’ve evidently accepted that God can exist – there are powerful logical, philosophical, and scientific arguments showing the truth of His existence.

    The final step, though, is incredibly hard – to believe not merely in a pantheistic conception of god, or just some benign but quite distant and impersonal deity, but in God the Father of Jesus Christ, requires a leap of faith that is genuinely terrifying.

    You are trying to seek out the truth and find your way back. This will take time. You are going about it the right way by trying to dissect arguments and ideas, and that’s great. The reason why you turned away from your faith originally is likely because you had no particularly strong arguments to back it. That is why it is vital to process and understand the apologetic arguments that show why God exists, and – if you have the tolerance for them – why Jesus Christ is Lord.

    Ease back into it, and you’ll be fine. In the meantime, pray and ask for guidance. Exactly how you do it is less important than simply DOING it.

    If it’s not too much trouble for you, can you share a post with your opinions on prayer and dealing with the stresses of life, especially events that you can’t control?

    Absolutely. It’ll take me some time to put together due to my busy schedule. But I’ll do it for sure.

    Reply

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